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2021

Maine Homes
Design Awards

- Judged Winners -

The Judges

Susan and Eliza Crater
President and creative director, Sister Parish

Sian Richards
Architectural photographer

Aaron Moser
Chairman of the board, Thos. Moser

Annabelle Selldorf

Annabelle Selldorf, FAIA
Founder and principal, Selldorf Architects

Loi ThaiLoi Thai
Interior and garden designer, Tone on Tone

The COVID-fueled urban exodus that has driven home buying and building through the proverbial roof, combined with months to focus on #pandemicprojects, made this a banner year for our fourth annual Maine Homes Design Awards contest. We know we gush about the beautiful submissions every year, but in 2021, they truly were unsurpassed.

Once again, we tapped a cast of accomplished judges with strong connections to the state: Susan and Eliza Crater, of iconic fabric and wallcovering company Sister Parish, renowned architect Annabelle Selldorf, and interior/garden designer extraordinaire Loi Thai all have homes here; architectural photographer Sian Richards is a Maine Homes contributor; and Aaron Moser’s family’s Auburn-based furniture brand, is, to many, a household name.

Dozens of talented folks submitted nearly 100 entries across five professional and five reader categories: curb appeal, living and/or dining room, kitchen, bath, and landscaping. Thousands of visitors also viewed our online gallery, casting votes to pick a Readers’ Choice winner in each category — check those out online here. And it was all for a good cause: All submission fees from this year’s contest will be donated to the Maine chapters of Habitat for Humanity, whose work building energy-efficient, affordable housing addresses an especially critical need right now.

Thanks to everyone who submitted and congratulations to the winners — including triple and double winners! — who entered these 10 stellar projects, blindly chosen by our judges. Special thanks to Knickerbocker Group and RE/MAX by the Bay for sponsoring this year’s competition. And if you didn’t get a chance to enter, there’s always next year!

The Sponsors

Knickerbocker Group

The Beneficiary

habitat for humanity

2021

Maine Homes Design Awards

- Judged Winners -

The COVID-fueled urban exodus that has driven home buying and building through the proverbial roof, combined with months to focus on #pandemicprojects, made this a banner year for our fourth annual Maine Homes Design Awards contest. We know we gush about the beautiful submissions every year, but in 2021, they truly were unsurpassed.

Once again, we tapped a cast of accomplished judges with strong connections to the state: Susan and Eliza Crater, of iconic fabric and wallcovering company Sister Parish, renowned architect Annabelle Selldorf, and interior/garden designer extraordinaire Loi Thai all have homes here; architectural photographer Sian Richards is a Maine Homes contributor; and Aaron Moser’s family’s Auburn-based furniture brand, is, to many, a household name.

Dozens of talented folks submitted nearly 100 entries across five professional and five reader categories: curb appeal, living and/or dining room, kitchen, bath, and landscaping. Thousands of visitors also viewed our online gallery, casting votes to pick a Readers’ Choice winner in each category — check those out online here. And it was all for a good cause: All submission fees from this year’s contest will be donated to the Maine chapters of Habitat for Humanity, whose work building energy-efficient, affordable housing addresses an especially critical need right now.

Thanks to everyone who submitted and congratulations to the winners — including triple and double winners! — who entered these 10 stellar projects, blindly chosen by our judges. Special thanks to Knickerbocker Group and RE/MAX by the Bay for sponsoring this year’s competition. And if you didn’t get a chance to enter, there’s always next year!

The Judges

Susan and Eliza Crater
President and creative director, Sister Parish

Sian Richards
Architectural photographer

Aaron Moser
Chairman of the board, Thos. Moser

Annabelle Selldorf

Annabelle Selldorf, FAIA
Founder and principal, Selldorf Architects

Loi ThaiLoi Thai
Interior and garden designer, Tone on Tone

The Sponsors

Knickerbocker Group

The Beneficiary

habitat for humanity

UP NEXT: PROFESSIONAL CURB APPEAL

Camp in the Trees Arrival

Photograph by JEFF ROBERTS

PROFESSIONAL CURB APPEAL

Camp in the Trees Arrival, Bridgton

Joanna Shaw says: This design is inspired by openness and connectivity, with the arrival into the home inviting people into the most transparent moment. The covered walkway, with views of Long Lake, tethers the kitchen, living room, dining room, and bedroom. Shedding walls and touching lightly on the site hold true to the design’s emphasis on function and simplicity. Torrefied-wood decking flows effortlessly between the trees and screen doors, leading to each element of the house.

Aaron Moser says: This camp demonstrates how good design is informed by nature. The home’s clean lines and thoughtful use of raw materials complement the rugged scenery, and the open walkway creates an unobtrusively functional structure that frames views of the lake, allowing the landscape to enhance the design.

Architects:
Joanna Shaw, Eric Sokol

General Contractor:
Symonds Builders

Landscape Architect:
Richardson & Associates

Landscaping Contractor:
Salmon Falls Nursery & Landscaping

Masonry Contractor:
G.M. Libby & Sons

Roofing Contractor:
Guy Kittel Construction

Structural Engineer:
Albert Putnam Associates

Windows:
Marvin Design Gallery by Eldredge Lumber

UP NEXT: PROFESSIONAL LIVING AND/OR DINING ROOM

West End

Photograph by ERIN LITTLE

PROFESSIONAL LIVING
AND/OR DINING ROOM

West End, Portland

Ariana Fischer says: This room in a traditional house was dark red with white trim. Luckily, the owner was open to adding some contemporary touches, which made it chic, cozy, and imminently comfortable. We added wall paneling to lend a stately feel and built-in shelves with a modern layout. Rich, glossy Argon by Fine Paints of Europe on the woodwork contrasts with the brown tones on the “coffered” ceiling, created with wallpaper. An antique Heriz rug grounds a pair of bergère chairs we topped with red velvet cushions. Their warmth is in direct contrast with the cool blue, striking a perfect balance between opposites.

Susan and Eliza Crater say: We were immediately drawn to this room, as it reminds us of our own home in Maine and spending many cool nights by the fire. We love how the designer has chosen to paint everything, including the fireplace, a rich blue — a bold, but beautiful, choice. And finding out that the coffered ceiling is wallpaper blew our minds!

Interior Designer:
Ariana Fischer

General Contractor:
M.R. Brewer

Painting Contractor:
Stephen Schools & Company

Wallpaper:
Andrew Martin

UP NEXT: PROFESSIONAL KITCHEN

Camp in the Trees Kitchen

Photograph by JEFF ROBERTS

PROFESSIONAL KITCHEN

Camp in the Trees Kitchen, Bridgton

Joanna Shaw says: This kitchen was designed to feel like a furnished space that invites you to prepare a meal. Priority was given to the connection between the kitchen and the adjacent screened porch — refreshments and dishes can be passed through the oversize double-hung windows. The materials palette of the fixtures, millwork, ceiling, and windows marries the sentiment of a traditional Maine camp with an elegant, yet functional, modern touch.

Sian Richards says: I love the juxtaposition of the modern architecture and casual camp style with the more dressed-up, formal look of the black cabinetry and appliances and brass accents. The result is sharp and contemporary, but also classic and timeless. The use of black adds a little drama but, in combination with all the wood, it also creates a grounded, earthy feel that is perfect for this environment. The diagonal floors also add something special, as they are a little unexpected. The layout is super-functional — and those pass-through windows to the porch are brilliant and fun. On the whole, I would say that all the elements in this space are beautifully tied together with an elegant, pared-back palette that will stand the test of time. This, of course, is a sign of great style!

Architects:
Joanna Shaw, Eric Sokol

General Contractor:
Symonds Builders

Structural Engineer:
Albert Putnam Associates

Cabinetry:
Warren Construction Group

Countertops:
Stone Surface

Windows:
Marvin Design Gallery by Eldredge Lumber

UP NEXT: PROFESSIONAL BATH

Bark Shingle Outside Bath

Photograph by JEFF ROBERTS

PROFESSIONAL
BATH

Bark Shingle Outside Bath, Rome

Joanna Shaw says: A shower tucked beneath the tree canopy suits this home on Great Pond, where activities and the design center on the outdoors. Hemlock walls provide selective views into the trees, balancing privacy and immersion in nature. Graciously thick poplar-bark shingles complete the rustic, yet graceful, space.

Loi Thai says: To live in Maine is to love the unspoiled landscape. What better way to take in nature than in an outdoor shower under the canopy of trees? This one is seamless with the surrounding forest — even the rustic shingles lining the stall blend right in. This is form and function at its best.

Architect:
Joanna Shaw

General Contractor:
Warren Construction Group

UP NEXT: PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPING

Coast House

Photograph by TRENT BELL

PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPING

Coast House, Kennebunkport

Marcus Gleysteen says: Coast House bisects its site, with a salt marsh at the entrance on the landward side and a tumbling bedrock beach behind. In addition to fully integrating the interior of the house with the powerful waterfront views, a key goal of the home’s orientation was to take advantage of as much of the front yard as possible. This area is protected from ocean winds and collects afternoon sun, creating a sheltered garden environment in contrast to the rawness of the wilder surrounding coast.

Annabelle Selldorf says: I am impressed with the careful consideration of scale in the landscaping of Coast House. The sheltered garden is a bit of a courtyard space with its own character. The plantings are low and not overly precise or tailored, and work well with the pavers and crushed-stone base introduced at the building’s edge.

Principal Architect:
Marcus Gleysteen

Landscape Architect:
Emma Kelly

Project Manager:
Maggie Baratz

General Contractor:
Bowley Builders

Landscaping Contractor:
Maine Stone & Landscape

Structural Engineer:
Roome & Guarracino

UP NEXT: READER CURB APPEAL

MCM Kezar Lake House

Photograph by BETH MILLAR

READER CURB APPEAL

MCM Kezar Lake House

BETH MILLAR

Beth Millar says: Our mid-century-modern lake house is nestled among the pines and wraps itself around the shore of Kezar Lake. Most houses here blend into their surroundings. I chose Behr’s Shadow Mountain for the cladding and Gilded Glamour, also by Behr, for some of the trim to do exactly that. The painters were skeptical at first, as a lot of houses in the area have a rustic brown-and-green vibe. I wanted a natural, but new, look. The exterior blends with the bark and the trim picks up the pine needles scattered about. Together, they reflect the peace and solitude we feel here.

Sian Richards says: I love houses that blend organically with, and almost disappear into, their natural surroundings — this house is one of them. The choice of the dark exterior was perfect in this instance because it enhances the interest of the rooflines and makes the surrounding greenery stand out. The walkway leading to the house creates an inviting welcome and adds to the overall warmth and earthiness that this home exudes.

Painting Contractor:
Picture Perfect Painting

UP NEXT: READER LIVING/DINING SPACE

Bath Maine-modern renovation

Photograph by CHRIS ANDERSON

READER LIVING/DINING SPACE

Bath Maine-Modern Renovation

CHRIS ANDERSON

Chris Anderson says: This living room is located in the ell between the main house and barn in a circa 1750 Cape. The space had been renovated by a prior owner in the 1990s, and was being used as an informal dining area off the kitchen. I decided that it would be more useful (and fun) as a loungey living room that showcased my growing art collection. I replaced the existing faux-wood floor with slate-like porcelain tiles, and simplified the color palette by painting the walls, ceiling, and trim in White Dove by Benjamin Moore and the doors in Railings by Farrow and Ball. The low-slung sectional left plenty of room for a gallery wall showing off works collected in my travels. The gallery wall makes the seven- and-a-half-foot-tall ceilings seem higher (and required lots of measuring, nails, and patching to get just right!). The hand-woven cotton rug, concrete tables, wood-and-leather chair, steel media console, and sculptural floor lamp make the space feel natural and airy, while keeping the focus on the art.

Annabelle Selldorf says: I like this living room because, although it’s not large, it shows how with just a few carefully selected pieces one can really create a sense of place. It looks simple, but clearly all of the furniture was thoughtfully chosen and the arrangement of the art on the wall demonstrates that someone gave this a lot of consideration — and it paid off.

General Contractor:
A.M. Friend Construction

Accent Table:
Overstock

Art:
J. Eddie Kirtley; sTo Len;
Sean Noonan; Sola Olulode;
Stephen Walling

Chair:
Homethreads

Coffee Table:
West Elm

Lamp:
Rejuvenation

Media Console:
Room & Board

Rug:
Rugs USA

Sectional:
Joss & Main

Throw:
Clove & Creek

Tile:
TileBar

Pillows:
Target

UP NEXT: READER KITCHEN

Yarmouth Village Kitchen Renovation

Photograph by LAURA SCHULER HAGEDORN

READER KITCHEN

Yarmouth Village Kitchen Renovation

LAURA SCHULER HAGEDORN AND BILL HAGEDORN

Bill Hagedorn says: We did a complete renovation of this once dark and dated 1980s kitchen in the heart of Yarmouth village. We opened up walls to provide more space and allow for a larger island. We also installed new, larger windows to bring in natural light and installed locally made custom cabinetry, painted in Benjamin Moore Narragansett Green, a color that is both bold and neutral and can read blue, green, gray, or charcoal in different lights. To add warmth and texture, we incorporated multiple finishes, including brass and stainless steel, honed Carrara-marble countertops, rustic ceramic- tile walls, and a painted nickel-gap ceiling.

Aaron Moser says: The clean, contemporary colors in this renovated kitchen keep the basic principle of minimalist design in mind while embracing components of a modern home. The culmination of color, space, and materials makes this room a thoughtful design statement.

General Contractor:
Adam Daly & Son Builders

Tile Contractor:
RF Tile

Floor Refinishing:
Casco Bay Hardwood Flooring

Cabinetry:
Udomsay Woodworkers

UP NEXT: READER BATH

Yarmouth Village Bathroom Renovation

Photograph by LAURA SCHULER HAGEDORN

READER BATH

Yarmouth Village Bath Renovation

LAURA SCHULER HAGEDORN AND BILL HAGEDORN

Bill Hagedorn says: We transformed a windowless first-floor powder/laundry room into a cheerful mudroom and powder room. For the latter, we chose bold, contrasting patterns with similar color palettes, in the form of wallpaper reminiscent of a Dahlov Ipcar painting and handmade cement floor tile. The patterns make the small room seem larger and add drama. The gold-leaf mirror and brass faucet reflect light and add warmth.

Susan and Eliza Crater say: Coming from a textile background, we love a good print-on-print moment. The reader has successfully paired the wallpaper and tile, creating a fun powder room for all to enjoy. The light fixture and mirror add special touches of warmth to the room, and we always love a pedestal sink!

General Contractor:
Adam Daly & Son Builders

Tile Contractor:
RF Tile

Faucet:
Brizo

Lighting:
Hinkley

Mirror:
Anthropologie

Tile:
Clé

Wallpaper:
Hygge & West

UP NEXT: READER LANDSCAPING

Buxton Bunting Hill Backyard

Photograph by AVERY PIERCE

READER LANDSCAPING

Buxton Bunting Hill Backyard

AVERY PIERCE AND TOM LANUCHA

Avery Pierce says: A photo in Fine Gardening magazine inspired the natural pool on our property. Because we set the pool into a steep slope, a retaining wall and foundational trees and shrubs — in this case junipers, forsythias, arborvitaes, Fraser firs, and cherry trees — were chosen to hold the embankment in place. With the bones established, I selected perennials with form, texture, bloom time, and color in mind, creating four-season interest. Some of my favorites include azaleas, weigelas, irises, peonies, roses, daisies, hydrangeas, and ornamental grasses.

Loi Thai says: The focal point of this garden is the pool, but it doesn’t scream “swimming pool” and that’s refreshing! Nestled among native trees, plants, and rocks, it looks like a Zen pond. The silvery-gray deck, which is so inviting, adds to the natural vibe. It is a thoughtfully layered garden that whispers serenity.

Pool & Masonry Contractor:
Robin’s Nest

Plants:
O’Donal’s Nursery


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