Historic Highlight

George F. West House

Historic Highlight

The next time you drive north into Portland on Interstate 295, look for the George F. West house looming atop the Western Promenade. With its two-story portico supported by granite columns, yellow-brick façade, and red-tile roof, the 13,674-square-foot Georgian Revival building stands out among the neighborhood’s more modest brick and clapboard homes. Inside, the mansion […]

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Dr. Cyrus Hamlin House

Historic Highlight

Dr. Cyrus Hamlin’s 1806 Paris Hill home was originally built as a large farmhouse with an attached barn. Embellishments such as the covered breezeway and full-façade porches came much later. Three years after the house’s construction, Dr. Hamlin and his wife, Anna, welcomed their fifth child, Hannibal, who later became ill. The Hamlin home was […]

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Daniel Walker House

Historic Highlight

After the close of the American Revolution, the shipbuilding industry in Kennebunkport was booming and development was on the rise. Among those building was Captain Daniel Walker, whose grand 1784 home on Maine Street was designed in the gabled central-chimney style that was prevalent during the Colonial period. Today, the house is seen as exceptional […]

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The McIntire Garrison

Historic Highlight

On the banks of the York River stands what is possibly Maine’s oldest home: a circa 1707 garrison constructed with heavy logs that were dovetailed at the joints to create a sturdy, weatherproof envelope — and fortification against Native American raids. Now featuring uncharacteristic clapboard and shingle sheathing and double-hung windows, the home nevertheless retains […]

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Samuel Spring House

Historic Highlight

In the 1850s, when Portland’s Western Promenade was largely wooded and swampy, Samuel Spring and his uncle, Andrew Spring, commissioned architect Charles Alexander to design twin Italianate villas that would sit side by side on Danforth Street. At the time, most of the Promenade was owned by J.B. Brown, who hired Alexander to design his […]

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James P. White House

Historic Highlight

Recognized as one of the finest examples of high-style Greek Revival architecture in the state, the James P. White House has held a prominent position at the entrance to downtown Belfast since 1842. Its eponymous first owner ascended from a modest log home nearby to become a successful merchant, financier, and mayor of Belfast during […]

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York Hall

Historic Highlight

When Bath’s York Hall was constructed in 1897, the architectural aesthetic in America was shifting away from ostentatious Victorian designs and back toward traditionalism. The Boston firm of Peabody & Stearns’ support for this stylistic renaissance is reflected in the Georgian Revival home its architects designed for prominent shipbuilder William Sewall and his wife, Rachel. […]

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Talbot Cottage

Historic Highlight

This circa 1890 emerald gem was erected in Kennebunkport as part of the 700-acre Cape Arundel Summer Colony — an enclave for wealthy urbanites who sought solitude and pastoral beauty in the picturesque coastal town. When constructing their unlikely-named “summer cottages,” many residents opted for shingle style designs that complemented the rugged landscape through their […]

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Tate House

Historic Highlight

One of the oldest wood-frame buildings in Portland, the 1755 Tate House is a stunning example of pre-Revolutionary Georgian architecture. Perched on a knoll overlooking the Fore River (and, formerly, a bustling mast yard) in Stroudwater Village, the home was built for Captain George Tate, who worked for the British Royal Navy overseeing the cutting […]

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Octagon House

Historic Highlight

Erected in 1858 by a local brickyard owner, Farmington’s Octagon House is one of approximately 19 houses in Maine and 2,000 in the United States built in the Octagon style.

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